A visual novel centered around the concept of “shipping” in the My Little Pony fandom.
It was created as a Ren’Py experiment where I tried to figure out how cheaply I could make something with the engine.
I asked myself if I could create something that would take me less time to create than it would take time to play through.
The answer is “maybe”. Someone wanting to get all endings without a guide and without looking at the source code will definitely have a hard time.
While it references adult subjects and erotic works, SESC is not pornographic in itself. I would personally rate it 12+. Some countries disagree, though.

Although I made the vector images, My Little Pony and its characters, including their names, are property of Hasbro. The company doesn’t endorse any of this in any way.
”A parody is a work that ridicules another, usually well-known work, by imitating it in a comic way. Judges understand that, by its nature, parody demands some taking from the original work being parodied. Unlike other forms of fair use, a fairly extensive use of the original work is permitted in a parody in order to “conjure up” the original. “
( https://fairuse.stanford.edu/overview/fair-use/what-is-fair-use/ )

No currency has been exchanged for the making of this visual novel and no money I may earn by any way will contribute to the making of more of these in the future.

 
In the spirit of the project, the main menu was put together with scraps. The characters were vector images I already had, the background is a blurred version of one used in the game and the title was done in five minutes after having googled “90s title” and reproduced the simplest style I saw.  The empty space on the left is for in-game menus.

In the spirit of the project, the main menu was put together with scraps. The characters were vector images I already had, the background is a blurred version of one used in the game and the title was done in five minutes after having googled “90s title” and reproduced the simplest style I saw.

The empty space on the left is for in-game menus.

The demo of the visual novel used backgrounds from the Pony Vector Club on DeviantArt. For the final release, I wanted as much content to be handmade/creditless as possible, thus I used Pixabay to get public domain images, then I applied some filters with GIMP and voilà.

The demo of the visual novel used backgrounds from the Pony Vector Club on DeviantArt. For the final release, I wanted as much content to be handmade/creditless as possible, thus I used Pixabay to get public domain images, then I applied some filters with GIMP and voilà.

Most vectors were made in 2014 to create what I once thought as placeholder images. In 2014, I had dreams of gathering artists to do some kind of collaborative works and have the ending images be the only legitimate parts of the visual novel.  Here, Rainbow Dash has a new tail compared to the endings, because I derped at an unknown point and the svg file lacked it, so I had to recreate it.

Most vectors were made in 2014 to create what I once thought as placeholder images. In 2014, I had dreams of gathering artists to do some kind of collaborative works and have the ending images be the only legitimate parts of the visual novel.

Here, Rainbow Dash has a new tail compared to the endings, because I derped at an unknown point and the svg file lacked it, so I had to recreate it.

I lacked the social knowledge and contacts required for such a feat. In 2019, when I went back on the project, I kept the placeholder images as final images and re-used the pony vectors as character images, for the same reason as the backgrounds.  Here, Fluttershy has been given eyebrows as a reference to some niche Japanese trend; her dialogues were so badly proofread before the demo was released that some people thought it was badly translated from a Japanese version of the game.

I lacked the social knowledge and contacts required for such a feat. In 2019, when I went back on the project, I kept the placeholder images as final images and re-used the pony vectors as character images, for the same reason as the backgrounds.

Here, Fluttershy has been given eyebrows as a reference to some niche Japanese trend; her dialogues were so badly proofread before the demo was released that some people thought it was badly translated from a Japanese version of the game.

All images have a fixed height, bu the width can change. I thought it would make it easier to have a constant height through the scenes, but it complicated things as soon as props were introduced, like magic horn glow or hats.  Here, Twilight Sparkle has @ to see how confused she is instead of handmade swirls, because it was way quicker to do it that way. Also, she lacks wings because her becoming an alicorn was really new when I started working on that project.

All images have a fixed height, bu the width can change. I thought it would make it easier to have a constant height through the scenes, but it complicated things as soon as props were introduced, like magic horn glow or hats.

Here, Twilight Sparkle has @ to see how confused she is instead of handmade swirls, because it was way quicker to do it that way.
Also, she lacks wings because her becoming an alicorn was really new when I started working on that project.

Due to some mishap, some endings were overwritten by others. Here is an ending I had to recreate for the final version of the game. If you look closely enough, you may notice some details are off.  Fun fact about the ending system; the vast majority of them allow the player to achieve them with one of the 6 characters available at the beginning. That means that, without changing anything but the final piece of code stating which image to display, I managed to create 6 different endings by writing 1.  This ending trickery has been my main way of inflating playtime and, of course, is something entirely despicable which should be pointed out and laughed at, not be used as a tip for makers of cash grabs.

Due to some mishap, some endings were overwritten by others. Here is an ending I had to recreate for the final version of the game. If you look closely enough, you may notice some details are off.

Fun fact about the ending system; the vast majority of them allow the player to achieve them with one of the 6 characters available at the beginning. That means that, without changing anything but the final piece of code stating which image to display, I managed to create 6 different endings by writing 1.

This ending trickery has been my main way of inflating playtime and, of course, is something entirely despicable which should be pointed out and laughed at, not be used as a tip for makers of cash grabs.

That first credit slide is one of my favourite images I made for the game; the ponies are old creations of mine. I still like Caramel Truffle, on the right, but am now unsatisfied with Ginster, on the left. Most of the text is from the image used in the demo, and I lost the source file, making it un-editable. I added updates to that text, but probably with a different police. I added the shape on the left as a way to make the black mane visible, then copy-pasted it on the right and double flipped it. The retro look inspired me into making a retro title for the main screen afterwards.  The resolution of the game is 1024x600 because I had a laptop with that resolution and was frustrated every time I tried to open a piece of software and was greeted with a message telling me that the minimum resolution was 1024x660. Or something like that; I haven’t touched the device for years now and have since moved on to better resolutions.

That first credit slide is one of my favourite images I made for the game; the ponies are old creations of mine. I still like Caramel Truffle, on the right, but am now unsatisfied with Ginster, on the left. Most of the text is from the image used in the demo, and I lost the source file, making it un-editable. I added updates to that text, but probably with a different police. I added the shape on the left as a way to make the black mane visible, then copy-pasted it on the right and double flipped it. The retro look inspired me into making a retro title for the main screen afterwards.

The resolution of the game is 1024x600 because I had a laptop with that resolution and was frustrated every time I tried to open a piece of software and was greeted with a message telling me that the minimum resolution was 1024x660. Or something like that; I haven’t touched the device for years now and have since moved on to better resolutions.